Saturday, December 12, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – 2 PM US Central – ONLINE

Join us for our Monthly NSS North Houston Space Society (http://NorthHoustonSpace.org) meeting. Come join others who are excited about exploring the cosmos, learning how to use the resources of space to improve human life, and who want to go and spread humanity to the rest of the universe.

The meeting will be on Saturday, December 12, 2020 at 2PM (CDT) ONLINE Via ZOOM:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85216600533

Tentative Agenda:
2:00 PM – Opening Remarks – Nathan Price
2:10 PM – Space Communicator SpeechAdam Hawkins
2:20 PM – Recent Space News – Greg Stanley
2:45 PM – Our Future in Space – Guided Discussion lead by Eagle Sarmont
3:30 PM – Q&A
3:45 PM -Share your personal space experiences since the last meeting. Rocket Launches, Other Meetings, Research, etc.
4:00 PM – End of Meeting

Our Future in Space

Eagle Sarmont will lead a discussion about our future in space around the following videos. Eagle has produced and collected much information about opening the High Frontier on his website: http://www.high-frontier.org/

Eagle is a retired aerospace engineer and ship’s officer who likes to design and build things.  He especially likes to design and build things that have never been thought of or built before.  He has designed, built, and test flown hang gliders, ultralight aircraft, homebuilt aircraft, and ground accelerators for launching rockets, and has helped design and build high-performance aircraft such as the F-5, F-18, F-20, F-22, F-35, U-2, SR-71, and the F-117. Some of his work is in orbit around the Earth and a satellite that is headed out of the solar system with his name on it.  He has done original research and have invented wondrous things including the non-rotating Skyhook.  

About the Meeting

Meetings are open to all age groups and interest levels. Come explore with us the potential that developing and exploring space has to better life here on earth and to open up new frontiers creating new perspectives that can help enrich the human experience.

The Vision of NSS is people living and working in thriving communities beyond the Earth, and the use of the vast resources of space for the dramatic betterment of humanity.

The Mission of NSS is to promote social, economic, technological, and political change in order to expand civilization beyond Earth, to settle space and to use the resulting resources to build a hopeful and prosperous future for humanity. Accordingly, we support steps toward this goal, including human spaceflight, commercial space development, space exploration, space applications, space resource utilization, robotic precursors, defense against asteroids, relevant science, and space settlement oriented education.

Website:  http://NorthHoustonSpace.org
MeetUp: https://www.meetup.com/Future-North-Houston-National-Space-Society-Chapter/
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NssNorthHoustonSpaceSociety/

Summary of Saturday, November 7, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – Featured Speaker: Elliot Roth – Growing Edible Algae on the Moon

Recording:

Attendees:

Space News

Starlink Daily Coverage Estimates: https://sebsebmc.github.io/starlink-coverage/index.html
Dart: https://www.nasa.gov/planetarydefense/dart

Featured Speaker: Elliot Roth – Growing Edible Algae on the Moon

Space Communicator Speech

Brynlee is the first person to complete all three speeches and receive the 2020 Space Communicator trophy!

Saturday, November 7, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – 2 PM US Central – ONLINE – Featured Speaker: Elliot Roth – Growing Edible Algae on the Moon

Join us for our Monthly NSS North Houston Space Society (http://NorthHoustonSpace.org) meeting. Come join others who are excited about exploring the cosmos, learning how to use the resources of space to improve human life, and who want to go and spread humanity to the rest of the universe.

The meeting will be on Saturday, November 7, 2020 at 2PM (CDT) ONLINE Via ZOOM:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85216600533

Tentative Agenda:
2:00 PM – Opening Remarks – Nathan Price
2:10 PM – Space Communicator Speech
2:20 PM – Recent Space News – Greg Stanley
2:45 PM – Growing Edible Algae on the Moon – Elliot Roth
3:30 PM – Q&A
3:45 PM -Share your personal space experiences since the last meeting. Rocket Launches, Other Meetings, Research, etc.
4:00 PM – End of Meeting

About the Speaker Elliot Roth

Elliot is the founder of Spira, a company that creates better-tasting spirulina as an ingredient for food companies. Spira has received awards from RebelBioLighthouse Labs, the World Food ProgrammeHalcyon IncubatorBeGreenCommBeBiz, and the National Science Foundation, and has presented at SXSWSynbiobeta and Thought for Food. Elliot is a Kairos Fellow, a Seasteading Ambassador, and Future Founders Fellow. Before Spira, Elliot graduated with a degree in biomedical engineering; he trained at the Stanford d.School as a University Innovation Fellow, and has 10 years of synthetic biology experience and worked for 5 years as a product consultant. He previously founded 6 failed startups and 2 successful nonprofits including an open community science lab. He is incredibly motivated to solve physiological needs using simple biological design.

About This Project

One of the biggest challenges for off-world life is the production of food. Astronauts need nutritionally dense, fast-growing and resource-efficient food that can be grown in a tiny amount of space. This experiment aims to grow spirulina algae to supply a nutritional supplement to the crew. Previous NASA experiments only tested dried spirulina algae. This experiment will test growing conditions and sentiments around fresh spirulina algae to enable nutrition for life in space.

What is the context of this research?

I was selected as a NASA analog astronaut at HI-SEAS to simulate living on the moon. These missions range from a few weeks to months, and test how people might live off-planet in a socially-isolated environment. The enclosed isolated space at HI-SEAS on the side of a volcano in Hawaii, provides a fertile test-bed to run experiments that enable life on other planets and give researchers a sense of what is required to make humanity thrive in those extreme environments.

I’m a giant space geek. Ever since I was a kid I launched rockets and dreamed of finding ways to explore the solar system. I started researching algae as a means of creating access to nutrition anywhere effortlessly, and was selected for this mission due to my experience.

What is the significance of this project?

Algae has the ability to grow quickly on just sunlight, CO2, water and salt while treating wastewater, bioremediating CO2, providing nutrition, and absorbing harmful radiation. This is essential in space when astronauts are resource limited. Previous research has been done by NASA and ESA to investigate the use of algae for closed life-support systems. That research has proceeded slowly as many astronauts did not like the taste of dried algae as a food source.

Fresh algae has no taste and can be grown quickly on-site. This experiment is meant to compare dried algae to fresh and measure the sentiments of fellow astronauts to this new food source while tracking metrics that relate to the growing, harvesting and consuming of freshly grown algae.

About the Meeting

Meetings are open to all age groups and interest levels. Come explore with us the potential that developing and exploring space has to better life here on earth and to open up new frontiers creating new perspectives that can help enrich the human experience.

The Vision of NSS is people living and working in thriving communities beyond the Earth, and the use of the vast resources of space for the dramatic betterment of humanity.

The Mission of NSS is to promote social, economic, technological, and political change in order to expand civilization beyond Earth, to settle space and to use the resulting resources to build a hopeful and prosperous future for humanity. Accordingly, we support steps toward this goal, including human spaceflight, commercial space development, space exploration, space applications, space resource utilization, robotic precursors, defense against asteroids, relevant science, and space settlement oriented education.

Website:  http://NorthHoustonSpace.org
MeetUp: https://www.meetup.com/Future-North-Houston-National-Space-Society-Chapter/
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NssNorthHoustonSpaceSociety/

Summary of Saturday, October 3, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – Featured Speaker: Richard D. Easton – GPS Declassified

Nathan’s Meeting Overview

BrynLee’s Space Communicator Speech on Space Suit

Greg’s News Update

Richard’s presentation on GPS

Saturday, October 3, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – 2 PM US Central – ONLINE – Featured Speaker: Richard D. Easton – GPS Declassified

Join us for our Monthly NSS North Houston Space Society (http://NorthHoustonSpace.org) meeting. Come join others who are excited about exploring the cosmos, learning how to use the resources of space to improve human life, and who want to go and spread humanity to the rest of the universe.

The meeting will be on Saturday, October 3, 2020 at 2PM (CDT) ONLINE Via ZOOM:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85216600533

Tentative Agenda:
2:00 PM – Opening Remarks – Nathan Price
2:10 PM – Space Communicator Speech
2:20 PM – Recent Space News – Greg Stanley
2:45 PM – “GPS Declassified” – Richard D. Easton
3:30 PM – Q&A
3:45 PM -Share your personal space experiences since the last meeting. Rocket Launches, Other Meetings, Research, etc.
4:00 PM – End of Meeting

About GPS Declassified – Richard D. Easton

Richard Easton is a Fellow of the Casualty Actuarial Society and works for an insurance operation in Irving, Tx. He has degrees from Brown University and the University of Chicago.

He has written and spoken widely on the history of GPS. He is the co-author of GPS Declassified: From Smart Bombs to Smartphones. It was selected for the 2016 Professional Recommended Reading List by the National Security Space Institute and was used in 2019 as a textbook by the Air Power School.

He gave a plenary address in 2009 to the Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference of the AIAA. He spoke in 2012 to the British Interplanetary Society and the National Maritime Museum. He has also talked at the Explorers Club and Air Force Space Command where Gen John Hyten, then its commander and now Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, introduced the talk. He has been on the John Batchelor Show and the Milt Rosenberg Show where he appeared with Paul Spudis.

Richard grew up with the space program. His father Roger Easton co-wrote the proposal for Project Vanguard and designed Vanguard 1 which is the oldest satellite still in orbit. He later played a major role in inventing GPS. In 2006, he received the National Medal of Technology from President Bush.

About GPS Declassified

GPS Declassified examines the development of GPS from its secret, Cold War military roots to its emergence as a worldwide consumer industry. Drawing on previously unexplored documents, the authors examine how military rivalries influenced the creation of GPS and shaped public perceptions about its origin. Since the United States’ first program to launch a satellite in the late 1950s, the nation has pursued dual paths into space—one military and secret, the other scientific and public. Among the many commercial spinoffs this approach has produced, GPS arguably boasts the greatest impact on our daily lives.

Told by the son of a navy insider—whose work helped lay the foundations for the system—and a science and technology journalist, the story chronicles the research and technological advances required for the development of GPS. The authors peek behind the scenes at pivotal events in GPS history. They note how the technology moved from the laboratory to the battlefield to the dashboard and the smartphone, and they raise the specter of how this technology and its surrounding industry affect public policy. Insights into how the system works and how it fits into a long history of advances in navigation tie into discussions of the myriad applications for GPS.

About the Meeting

Meetings are open to all age groups and interest levels. Come explore with us the potential that developing and exploring space has to better life here on earth and to open up new frontiers creating new perspectives that can help enrich the human experience.

The Vision of NSS is people living and working in thriving communities beyond the Earth, and the use of the vast resources of space for the dramatic betterment of humanity.

The Mission of NSS is to promote social, economic, technological, and political change in order to expand civilization beyond Earth, to settle space and to use the resulting resources to build a hopeful and prosperous future for humanity. Accordingly, we support steps toward this goal, including human spaceflight, commercial space development, space exploration, space applications, space resource utilization, robotic precursors, defense against asteroids, relevant science, and space settlement oriented education.

Website:  http://NorthHoustonSpace.org
MeetUp: https://www.meetup.com/Future-North-Houston-National-Space-Society-Chapter/
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NssNorthHoustonSpaceSociety/Posted on

SUMMARY of Saturday, September 5, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – Dr. Moriba Jah (University Texas at Austin)

Opening Comments – Nathan Price

Nathan Price, NSS North Houston Space Society President, opened with a few remarks to set the stage of why we have these meetings and what the point of it is. Our future can be an amazing thing. We can address all resource issues, have unlimited opportunity and adventure for all. This is the promise of space exploration. There is more off of the earth than on it.

Imagine a future where energy is limitless, all metals and resources are cheap, and we are constantly pushing the boundaries of what we know and what we can do.

The alternative is that we need to stick with what we have. And we need to get as much of it for ourselves as possible. Because in order for us to have something, some believe, we must take it from others.

But this is a false choice. What is more limited than land? “Invest in land, because they are not making any more of it.” was investment advice I once heard. But yet, the crops produced from land has change radically overtime. Because we learned better ways to grow crops. And the amount of labor to grow those crops have plummeted overtime.

Every brain that we put towards solving the actual physical problems of humanity, the better it is for everyone. And sometimes that person with the key insight that opens doors for all of us, comes from the most unexpected place.

High School Aerospace Scholars – Sashreek Bhagavatula

Sashreek Bhagavatula had participated in the High School Aerospace Scholars program. This program is available to Texas high school juniors that are US Citizen. It is a year long virtual relationship with NASA includes Interactive lessons on NASA activities related to space exploration, earth science, technology and aeronautics, Design challenges such as 3D drawing, video creation and interactive poster design, and Virtual chats with NASA engineers and scientists.

The highest achieving students get to go to an one week workshop at the Johnson Space Center. There they get to participate on Team projects and briefings directed by NASA engineers and scientists. And perform a Hands-on design challenge and engineering activities planning an Artemis-themed mission. And get tours of NASA facilities.

If you are interested in applying, then check out their website:
https://nas.okstate.edu/has/index.html

Important dates:

Application OpensTuesday, September 8, 2020
Information SessionWednesday, September 23, 2020 from 6 to 7 p.m. CDT Click Here for info session.
Information SessionTuesday, October 6, 2020 from 5 to 6 p.m. CDT Click Here for info session.
Information SessionWednesday, October 14, 2020 from 4 to 5 p.m. CDT Click Here for info session.
Application ClosesWednesday, October 21, 2020, 2 p.m. CDT
Online SessionNovember 2020 – February 2021
Student SelectionsApril 2021
Onsite WorkshopsTBD

Recent Space News – Greg Stanley

There is an increasing amount of space exploration and development activity between each of the meetings that we could easily devote the entire meeting just reviewing what has happened in the past month. Greg Stanley did a wonderful job of sifting through all the bits of news and bringing out some of the key points.

“Monitoring, Quantifying, and Assessing the Near-Earth Anthropogenic Space Object Population: The Foundation to Space Traffic Management” – Moriba Jah – Astrodynamicist – UT Austin

Dr. Moriba Jah described the challenges with observing, tracking, and predicting orbital debris in the near earth environment. He has been working with colleagues and students to create a set of tools that help to combine information from multiple sources and to create a common way of sharing the data and communicating about it.

http://astria.tacc.utexas.edu/AstriaGraph/

Saturday, September 5, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – 2 PM US Central – ONLINE – Featured Speaker: Moriba Jah – Astrodynamicist – UT Austin

Join us for our Monthly NSS North Houston Space Society (http://NorthHoustonSpace.org) meeting. Come join others who are excited about exploring the cosmos, learning how to use the resources of space to improve human life, and who want to go and spread humanity to the rest of the universe.

The meeting will be on Saturday, September 5, 2020 at 2PM (CDT) ONLINE Via ZOOM:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85216600533

Tentative Agenda:
2:00 PM – Opening Remarks – Nathan Price
2:05 PM – High School Aerospace Scholars Program – Sashreek Bhagavatula
2:25 PM – Recent Space News – Greg Stanley
2:45 PM – “Monitoring, Quantifying, and Assessing the Near-Earth Anthropogenic Space Object Population: The Foundation to Space Traffic Management” – Moriba Jah – Astrodynamicist – UT Austin
3:15 PM – Q&A
3:30 PM – Space Communicator Speech
3:45 PM -Share your personal space experiences since the last meeting. Rocket Launches, Other Meetings, Research, etc.
4:00 PM – End of Meeting

About Sashreek Bhagavatula

Previewing IMG_5377.JPG

Sashreek will be talking about his experience in the High School Aerospace Scholars Program. He participated in this program the summer before his senior year of high school. It is a great experience for those interested in the STEM career field and gives you great insight into the various project NASA works on.

Sashreek is a senior at Texas A&M University studying Computer Engineering. His interests lie in Software Engineering, Data Science, and Entrepreneurship. Sashreek previously worked at State Street Corporation as a Software Engineer and Chevron as a Data Engineer. Sashreek also serves as the Director of Technology for the non-profit organization PEAC (Promoting Education Across the Country). Outside of his academic life, Sashreek plays tennis, loves learning about space and innovative technologies, and enjoys reading comics.

About Moriba Jah

Dr. Moriba Jah joined the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics in 2017. His research interests are in non-gravitational astrodynamics and advanced/non-linear multi-sensor/object tracking, prediction, and information fusion. His expertise is in space object detection, tracking, identification, and characterization, as well as spacecraft navigation.

He received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, Arizona, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering Sciences from the University of Colorado at Boulder specializing in astrodynamics and statistical orbit determination.

Prior to being at UT Austin, Dr. Jah was the Director of the University of Arizona’s Space Object Behavioral Sciences with applications to Space Domain Awareness, Space Protection, Space Traffic Monitoring, and Space Debris research to name a few. Preceding that, Dr. Jah was the lead for the Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) Advanced Sciences and Technology Research Institute for Astronautics (ASTRIA) and a Principal Investigator for Detect/Track/Id/Characterize Program at AFRL’s Space Vehicles Directorate.

Before joining AFRL in 2007, he was a spacecraft navigator for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA, serving on Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Express (joint mission with ESA), Mars Exploration Rovers, Hayabusa (joint mission with JAXA), and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Dr. Jah is a member of the Astrodynamics Technical Committee of the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) and a permanent member of the Space Debris Technical Committee of the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA). He is a Fellow of the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), the AFRL, the AAS and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), as well as an AIAA Associate Fellow, IEEE Senior Member, Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronics Systems, IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, and Elsevier Information Fusion Journal.

Dr. Jah is a world-recognized subject matter expert in astrodynamics-based Space Domain Awareness sciences and technologies with 75+ publications in peer-reviewed journals, conferences, and symposia. He’s been an invited lecturer and keynote speaker at 20+ national and international space events, workshops and fora.

SUMMARY of Saturday, August 1, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – Jennifer Lopez (Astrobotic)


All of life that we know, all of civilization, everything has only been on the earth. We know by looking at other stars that our sun (in a billion or 2 billion years) will heat up and expand ending all life on the earth. And if that is as far as we have gone, then that is the end of the line for us.

But it does not have to be, we can expand beyond earth. We can use the resources in the rest of the solar system to develop our space resources further. We can learn how to travel to other stars. These problems seem impossible to solve, but consider how far we have come. Consider how far we could go.

This is the vision of the National Space Society (NSS). We want to see people living in communities beyond the earth. And we want to use the vast resources of space of the dramatic benefit of humanity (all of humanity).

North Houston Space Society is a chapter of the NSS. We seek to educate ourselves and our community about all the events that are happening in space, the potential that space offers to humanity, and ways that we can work to realize that benefit.

We do this by having monthly meetings where we get updates on recent space news, invite speakers from industry, and work to expand the vision and reach of humanity.

We also work to develop our ability to communicate the benefits and challenges of space through programs like the Space Communicators program. This involves giving three short speeches. Each in one of these categories.

Brynlee Wright gave her first speech today. Starting with her personal space speech.


Greg Stanley then gave us an update on recent space news, focusing on the recent Mars missions.

Then we had Jennifer W. Lopez from Astrobotic talk about the work that her company is doing to open up access to the lunar surface.

Saturday, August 1, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – 2 PM US Central – ONLINE – Featured Speaker: Jennifer Lopez (Astrobotic)

Join us for our Monthly NSS North Houston Space Society (http://NorthHoustonSpace.org) meeting. Come join others who are excited about exploring the cosmos, learning how to use the resources of space to improve human life, and who want to go and spread humanity to the rest of the universe.

The meeting will be on Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 2PM (CDT) ONLINE Via ZOOM:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85216600533

Agenda:
2:00 PM – Opening Remarks – Nathan Price
2:05 PM – Space Communicator Speech
2:10 PM – Recent Space News – Greg Stanley
2:30 PM – Jennifer Lopez, Director of Business Development, Astrobotic
Astrobotic overview, lunar partnerships & sponsorships, commercial lunar landscape
3:15 PM – Q&A
3:30 PM – Share your personal space experiences since the last meeting. Rocket Launches, Other Meetings, Research, etc.
4:00 PM – End of Meeting

Featured Speaker: Jennifer Lopez
Director of Business Development, Astrobotic

Jennifer W. Lopez leads commercial lunar partnerships and sponsorships as the Director of Business Development at Astrobotic Technology, Inc., a space robotics and lunar logistics company commissioned by NASA to be the first U.S. mission to land on the Moon since the Apollo era. Astrobotic’s inaugural flight will carry more than 22 unique payloads from 6 nations and will
be the first commercial planetary mission to land on the lunar surface in 2021. Jennifer also supports lunar payload development as part of NASA’s Artemis Human Landing System in collaboration with prime contractor Dynetics, which aims to send the first woman and the next
man to the Moon by 2024.

Prior to Astrobotic, Jennifer served as the Technology Lead in Commercial Innovation and Sponsored Programs with the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory for almost 4 years where she identified, developed, & fostered space-based R&D and breakthrough technological innovations. Research areas under her leadership included in-space
manufacturing, robotics, AI and other emerging technologies aimed to maximize utilization of the ISS for terrestrial benefit and help pave the way toward commercialization in low Earth orbit and future orbiting platforms.

Jennifer also serves on the Advisory Council of the Physics & Astronomy Department at Johns Hopkins University, a world leader in groundbreaking research in condensed matter physics, particle physics, astronomy, and astrophysics; is a founding member of the NASA Datanaut Corps program at NASA Headquarters and is a National Geographic Explorer.

About the Meeting

Meetings are open to all age groups and interest levels. Come explore with us the potential that developing and exploring space has to better life here on earth and to open up new frontiers creating new perspectives that can help enrich the human experience.

The Vision of NSS is people living and working in thriving communities beyond the Earth, and the use of the vast resources of space for the dramatic betterment of humanity.

The Mission of NSS is to promote social, economic, technological, and political change in order to expand civilization beyond Earth, to settle space and to use the resulting resources to build a hopeful and prosperous future for humanity. Accordingly, we support steps toward this goal, including human spaceflight, commercial space development, space exploration, space applications, space resource utilization, robotic precursors, defense against asteroids, relevant science, and space settlement oriented education.

Website:  http://NorthHoustonSpace.org
MeetUp: https://www.meetup.com/Future-North-Houston-National-Space-Society-Chapter/
FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/NssNorthHoustonSpaceSociety/Posted on

Summary of Saturday, July 11, 2020 – Monthly Meeting – Yumna Majeed

We had quite a few people attend our July meeting.

We had a packed agenda.

The meeting started with Nathan Price, NSS North Houston Space Society president, introducing the active environment that the earth inhabits in the solar system.

The Comet NEOWISE was just detected March 2020, and could be seen in the early morning hours of July is a reminder that we have much more to discover about our solar system and the threats and opportunities it has.

Meteors can constantly be seen from the earth. They come in all sizes. Most burn up in the atmosphere. Most of the ones that do make it through the atmosphere end up in the oceans. But occasionally they make spectacular displays. Consider these two from last month:

There are millions of other asteroids and comets that cross in the vicinity of earth that we have yet to discover. Consider how our knowledge has increased between 1999 and 2018.

We need to explore, monitor, and discover as many of these as we can. We need to make sure they do pose a threat to the earth or other human settlements throughout the solar system. And we need to have the capabilities to deflect, redirect, destroy the ones that do pose a danger to the earth.

But these asteroids and comets are not just a threat. They are also an opportunity. They contain data about the early days of our solar system, about parts of our solar system we may not be able to directly access, and about other star systems. They are also a source for materials. Rare Earth Metals actually come from asteroids. And the moon may have an abundance of them. We should go and see.

The National Space Society wants to raise awareness of the threats and opportunities that space poses. We want to see humanity master space and to treat space as just another domain for human activity. If you share this vision, please sign up for our mailing list and join the National Space Society.

Greg Stanley gave an awesome and thorough update on recent space news.

(See the video of using a Firefly rocket to light candles on birthday cake)

Then we had Yumna Majeed tell us about her journey and experience inspiring people in Pakistan to look up at the stars and to be inspired by the opportunity it represents.


Yumna won a telescope signed by Astronaut Mark Kelly. She had difficulty getting it through customs as officials could not understand what peaceful, useful, educational purpose a person would want a telescope. There are many opportunities for the advancement of space and astronomical education in Pakistan (and in the rest of the world as well).

Yumna explain the difficulties with getting astronomical equipment in Pakistan and with observing at night time. David Cheuvront, a NSS North Houston Space Society member, suggested online observatory programs such as Observing with Nasa and through immersive experiences such as NASA’s eyes.

Sam also suggested that Yumna should try to connect with Dr. Pervez Hoodbhoy who been pushing for more online education with onset of the COVID crisis:

Dr. Pervez Hoodbhoy has an impressive track record of advancing science and space education in Pakistan. He did a TEDx talk:

He has done many documentaries and discussions about space. Here is just one of many that I found on the internet:

After a Q&A session with Yumna, meeting members were invited to share their astronomical experiences since the last meeting.

Vito shared a movie called Cosmos that came out in 2019 that received weak reviews, but was fairly good. “Cosmos explores the thrilling first hours of first contact when three astronomers accidentally intercept what they believe to be a faint, coded signal from a distant alien civilisation”

Peter shared an event coming up next weekend:
An Intervening Conversation: Does Human Progress Live in Space Now? A Galactic View of Humanity (Webinar)
Saturday July 18, 2020 1PM CDT
RSVP Here
Here are some more details about the event:

LaRouchePAC will host a webinar on July 18th, on space exploration as the means to take another large leap for mankind, a leap which is particularly needed now as we deal with COVID and its economic devastation. We would like very much for you to attend and participate, particularly if you are young and intrigued with the idea of creating a future loaded with awesome new discoveries about the nature of humans and the nature of our universe, overcoming the barriers which only seem to stand in our way. 

The existential question that had been often posed by American Statesman and economist Lyndon LaRouche is, “What is man in the universe?” “For example, human existence is not merely conditional on the conditions on earth, the conditions on earth are subject to changes in the changing conditions of life within the solar system. In turn, the conditions for human life within the solar system as a whole, are shaped by the cyclical and other changes within our galaxy.” LaRouche insisted that the universe itself was provably anti-entropic and creative and that harnessing that creativity was the mission of mankind.

Did you know that right now on the International Space Station scientists are using microgravity, which allows for growth in three dimensions, to attempt to grow human organs for transplant use on earth?  

Right now also, 3D printing is being used to create the parts needed for extended space exploration, right on the space station, in space, rather than the very expensive process of creating and ferrying spare parts and repaired parts into space from earth.  

Have you thought about the fact that nations are racing now to mine helium 3 on the moon? The isotope is plentiful there and makes fusion energy possible.   Fusion energy is the means to power exploration of the universe and ensure that every place on earth has an available cheap energy source.  

This month marks the 45th anniversary of the Apollo-Soyuz Mission that launched on July 15, 1975. Through space cooperation we have continued to broaden the imagination, and develop the higher human identity found at the frontiers of scientific discovery. 

This month the United States is preparing to launch the 2020 Mars Perseverance Rover, which will carry with it the first Mars helicopter, Ingenuity. China will be launching its first Mars mission with an orbiter and rover, Tianwen-1, and the United Arab Emirates will launch their Mars orbiter, Hope or Al Amal, on a Japanese JAXA rocket.  

What if a new generation of our youth, like the Apollo generation, were trained at the highest level of science and in the bold attitude of mind which conquers the unknown, the promise now implicit in President Trump’s Artemis program? There would be no limits to human progress.